Equipment Calibration

What is Equipment Calibration, and Why is it Important?

Some laboratory instruments are calibrated periodically, usually every four or eight weeks. It is the calibration interval and is a predetermined value between the mean of the last three readings and the current one. The calibration is performed to ensure that the instrument is not giving out readings that can be misinterpreted as incorrect.

The calibration process involves setting up an instrument to give scientifically valid sample measurement results within an acceptable margin. This task requires a comparison between your test instrument and a commonly accepted reference measurement (usually the standard equipment used in laboratories). If your equipment has been calibrated, you should be able to establish the relative accuracy of your measurements without any outside influence, as is normally the case when you use non-standardized measures. Usually, scientists should carry out their calibration when they do not access the necessary materials.

How is equipment Calibration Carried Out?

In simple terms, calibration is the procedure of deciding an analytical instrument or machine to measure against the manufacturer’s specific specifications consistently. Reference instruments are sometimes shipped to a calibration laboratory to undergo constant calibration corresponding to international standards.

The first and most important part of the calibration procedure is the test program. This will specify the standard of care to which the equipment and devices should be held while in service. It will also determine the frequency of testing and how long each testing cycle will last. Each calibration cycle is designed to accumulate enough data points so that the sample’s average mechanical pressure, relative humidity, and electrical conductivity can be calculated. All of the calibration data and resulting performance outcomes are then recorded and used to allow a company the opportunity to determine whether they require any preventive maintenance or other services such as instrument overhauling.

Types of Equipment Calibrations

Humidity and Temperature calibration

You will need to calibrate them if you work with thermostats, thermal imaging cameras, weather sites, or other accessories that operate with the temperature and humidity. The control environment demands this type of calibration services, so external changes can not modify the results. Calibration quantifies and handles misreadings or contingencies within measure processes to a pleasing level.

Electrical calibration 

Electrical calibration refers to the procedure of correcting or testing any device that either measures or monitors electrical parameters with respect to its load condition. This field is sometimes referred to as low-frequency electrical metering and dc measurement. There are many different types of testing equipment used in the process, and they include load cells, resistors, capacitors, sensors, and tester probes. It is important to understand how each type works with others and troubleshoot them if they do not function correctly.

Mechanical calibration 

Mechanical calibration is the process of evaluating a measuring device using a standard or mechanical device as a reference point by which one can guess the measurement of the quality of a component. In this sense, mechanical calibration means manual adjustments made to instruments to enable them to be used more accurately in measurements. Although several types of mechanical calibration devices are available for different purposes, the principle remains the same: once an instrument has been calibrated, it is suitable for further use.